Jeremy Glauser Transcript

Clint Betts

Jeremy, thanks so much for coming on. It means a lot to us. I think the company that you're building here is actually really important. eLuma Therapy, the project that you guys are working on, the problem you're trying to solve rather, I should say, is quite incredible and I want to dig into that, but at one point did you know that you were an entrepreneur?

Jeremy Glauser

Pretty early on. I was nine years old when my brothers lassoed me into what was then the family business: mowing lawns. So we would knock doors, push lawn mowers up and down, weed whack, sweep, mow. So, from there my brothers moved on, I kept it going until I was about 14 and then I started working for a real entrepreneur and reno-ed houses and put in yards and sprinkler systems and he was really a serial entrepreneur and taught me a lot about what it means to have an idea and to take it to fruition. Then I just kept an eye on it and what would I want to do to really have a positive impact on the world. So I think I knew from pretty young that I was an entrepreneur, I was a builder, so to speak.

Clint Betts

Did you go to school?

Jeremy Glauser

I did. I did go to school. School is always a big part. As a matter of fact, my mom was an elementary teacher, and that influenced what I'm doing today for sure. It was always instilled in us to go on and get a higher education. So after we were in high school, I went to Brigham Young University, played soccer, got an education, and I miss those days sometimes. Those were good days.

Clint Betts

Of course. College is like you're just having fun. You don't have to answer this, but I'd prefer that you do, I assumed you liked playing soccer more than going to classes?

Jeremy Glauser

Oh yeah. I liked working more than I liked going to classes. I mean here's the truth, that was a very formative time for me. My mom died when I was 18 and she had been my biggest promoter, my biggest fan, and I felt like a big gaping hole had entered my life and it caused a lot of introspection, reflection. So when I went on to college, I really felt alone and I was almost like rediscovering my identity a little bit. So yeah, soccer was part of that. I worked a ton, barely ever made it to class, and was doing my homework in class. I'll bet you some of my professors wondered what the heck I was up to, but I was just running ragged all over the place. Those were formative years, man.

Clint Betts

Well, yeah. I mean I can't even imagine losing your mother at 18 years old. That's got to be devastating. That just seems like the worst possible age I could think of.

Jeremy Glauser

It was.

Clint Betts

Yeah, it's awful. Because you're about to go out-

Jeremy Glauser

Growing up everyone said, "Jeremy, you're just like your mom. You've got so much of your mom." So I had five brothers and it was hard on all of us, and for me in my unique situation it was hard because I felt like I related so much to her and she was a great mentor and then she actually died very suddenly. She was healthy and then died within seven to ten days, if I remember correctly. So it was a system shock, but as hard as it is to lose someone and you can never replace that someone, it really did form my life mission. It helped me articulate that I'm really here to help people fulfill their potential, and much of who I am is really tied back to not only her legacy as a living person but her legacy as someone who's passed on. So it's been hard of course, but it's also been highly motivating.

Clint Betts

So why did you keep yourself so busy with soccer, with classes and then with working? Were you working out of necessity or were you working like that hard and constantly being busy just because you didn't want to think about the devastating stuff that had happened?

Jeremy Glauser

You know, I've never gone to therapy to really uncover that exact thing but I'll tell you what.

Clint Betts

Welcome to therapy, my friend.

Jeremy Glauser

I sure need to, yes, thank you, Clint.

Clint Betts

Happy to do it.

Jeremy Glauser

I think it's a combination of all those things. I got some scholarships through hard work and getting grades in high school. That was a huge, huge help. But I didn't get any help outside of that. So rent, food, all that stuff. I had to earn the money for it, and so that's why I was working so hard. Plus I'm just the personality that I love to work and to get things done, so having a few irons in the fire never bothered me. I actually quite enjoyed being able to work that much, go to school, play soccer, it kept me busy.

Clint Betts

I had a very similar college experience. Well, I guess kind of very similar. I got married super young and you have life responsibilities at that point where you have to make a living. So, I'm going to school kind of as an afterthought, but like my working was what I was doing. Just like providing for the family which is really interesting. But you played soccer, you were an athlete. I was not an athlete at all. What did you learn playing soccer at a collegiate level that has helped you in your entrepreneurial journey?

Jeremy Glauser

Resilience, and I know that is a loaded term or loaded word but growing up I played soccer competitively in Southern California and I was pretty good. I competed with some of the really good teams down there. I started, then I got to BYU and I didn't start. There were players who had taken those positions, so I wasn't used to riding the bench. I wasn't used to being one of the players in practice who helped ensure that the starters were fit. I was the starter. That was really hard for me, emotionally, and I mean I was coming off of my mother's death and feeling lonely and I had a hard time connecting with a bunch of the guys because my identity was in balance and that taught me a lot of resilience. I served a mission for my church and then I came back and I thought that I had a role on the team, but I was cut, and I was ... I was pretty upset to be honest, and that next year, I worked my butt off, trained ... I was more fit than I had ever been, and I went back and maybe it was a personal vendetta, I don't know. I went into that tryout season so determined, and I was lucky enough to be placed back on the team. But I still didn't have a starting position.

I think what I learned was that I love the game, I love the competition, and whether I was going to play or not, I was going to put in everything I could. And I definitely started some games, but I never really achieved that starting position. I think what it taught me, Clint, is that resilience comes from within you and no one else is going to give it to you. You've got to find where it is that the passion comes from and it's the passion that will drive you to succeed. So it was a good experience in hindsight, although I would have loved to play a little more on the field during those games.

Clint Betts

Do you still play? Just for fun?

Jeremy Glauser

I wish. I try to do some pickup every so often. I found myself becoming a really good fan. I love the Real Salt Lake soccer team. Got season tickets, watch their games, go to their games, and I'm a great fan.

Clint Betts

So, at what point did you start thinking about starting your own company?

Jeremy Glauser

I was always thinking about it. As a kid, working for an entrepreneur, you see the world from an entrepreneur's eye and you always look for problems. "Oh, I could solve this, I could solve that." So from a young age I had this ongoing list of business ideas and as I grew older, left the house, started playing soccer, was going to college, I was always keeping an eye out for it and I ended up working for some smaller companies, some startups, just keeping an eye out for it, and it was during that time I really learned that my mission is to help people fulfill their human potential. So the business ideas that I was keeping an eye on were really related to that.

Another key point was I was studying linguistics at the university and debating what I would do until I found the idea I wanted to build and really invest in. One day I came across a concept that is called telehealth. This was 12 years ago, and I started looking into it. I was working in education technology, studying linguistics, and realizing, "Man, I have a passion for language and how people speak, but I also love education." So the lack of therapists available to school systems was becoming a big problem, and this concept of telehealth was becoming more widespread, being researched, and I came across it and I thought, "Wow. That is a perfect intersection of my love for linguistics, helping kids, helping people, and really loving the education industry and helping educators and administrators achieve their goals." It was really at that intersection that I started to realize, "This is it. I think this is the idea that I want to move forward with."

Clint Betts

Well 12 years ago, telehealth would have been like in the nascent stages, right? It was like an idea, like you're saying, like it was mostly like, "Hey, this kind of all has to be in-person." Now is it even called telehealth or is it just called health?

Jeremy Glauser

Yeah. It's still called telehealth, but it's referred to with many different names. Teletherapy, telepractice, telehealth, online therapy. It kind of depends who you're talking to and the terms that they're familiar with. But you're right, it was very nascent 12 years ago. You'd really find it in academic journals, being researched at universities, but known across the system in schools or healthcare, it was very much a new idea and very many people were skeptical of it. But you could tell that there was a lot of momentum gaining and the need was only growing because the shortage of providers was only growing.

Clint Betts

How did you get a sense for the need? How did you get a sense for like, "Hey, there's not enough therapists inside the schools." That's interesting.

Jeremy Glauser

I was into education technology already, so I was working with schools. The company I was with at the time was called Complete Speech, and the solution was sold into schools and sold into clinicians. So I was working in that space and I think that sometimes as entrepreneurs, we think that we'll get this lightning bolt idea from out of nowhere, but what I found that's more practical than that, you're working in a space, you're working in an industry, and for me that was the case, is I heard the signs, I heard the people talking. I was reading about it, I was going to conferences, and all of those touchpoints culminated in what I felt like was an idea with enough validation.

Clint Betts

So, at what point did you start eLuma Therapy?

Jeremy Glauser

In 2009, or sorry, 2011, is when we actually started it. September 5, 2011. There's always that decision of do you bootstrap it, do you go raise capital—and early on, I made the decision to just build it organically and bootstrap it because education usually adopts new ideas on a slower schedule. So going out and raising money just wasn't the first thing.

Clint Betts

Well, and selling into education is a long runway, right? Like that's not like a typical B2B deal. There's a lot of approval processes and things like that as well, and so—

Jeremy Glauser

Yeah. I refer to ours as a complex sell. It's not transactional, there's multiple stakeholders. There's a lot of programming, there are definitely multiple people and multiple hoops that you've got to jump through.

Clint Betts

It's probably pretty sticky though once you get in.

Jeremy Glauser

Yes. Depending on the solution that you're selling, at first, I think that this is part of our learning curve. At first it was very much a staffing kind of solution. I would work with charter schools here locally in Utah, call them up, we've got therapists, and then we would build a school and then collect and pay the therapist out of those proceeds. With the ultimate goal that we build software that would make it more effective, that would make it more productive for schools and therapists.

So over the course of the first five or six years, it was really us connecting therapists with school systems, not using any proprietary technology. It wasn't until about six years in that we started investing in technology, hired engineers, and really started to build that out. That's become a very big part of our strategy, it's become a very big part of the solution to the problem that these schools face.

Clint Betts

Have you grown it organically and bootstrapped it continually, or how has your journey around finding investors, taking investments, has that changed at all?

Jeremy Glauser

It has. It's evolved a lot and it's been an interesting experience because I would say early on, I was the kind of entrepreneur who would say, “We're going to do this, we're just going to grind it out, we're going to bootstrap it.” And as we have grown and as challenges have become more complex and opportunities have become larger, it's become very obvious I think to us as a team that partnership is an inevitability. There's only so much you can do with the limited resources as you bootstrap. The other decision was this isn't the lifestyle business, this is a business that we really want to make a difference with and that we really want to grow aggressively. So about two years ago, we started talking about that idea and then within the last year, we've just been playing around with it. We've been talking with my leadership team and others, trusted advisors, and not really knowing if there would be a partner that would be a good match for us, and just recently, we feel like we've found an amazing partner, focused on education, focused on investing in growth stage companies and really just level-headed, awesome people.

So we did. We brought on an investor, Leeds Equity Partners, in June of this year. So we're excited about the future, we're excited about having a partner with more resources, help us scale more effectively through buy, build and partner strategies, versus just build it and grind it out ourselves. It's an exciting time.

Clint Betts

Well, it's also got to be validating, right? To be working on something for over a decade and to find a partner like that who believes in it and puts some cash in it and it's also going to probably be rewarding given that you have spent a decade on the business, like I'm sure those negotiations were great, right? It's not like convincing the investor that you're going to continue to do the business or any of that type of stuff, right? It's like, “Look at our track record, look at what we've done, and come help us grow it rather than help us start it.”

Jeremy Glauser

I think you're exactly right, and I think that's why there are a lot of factors that go into any decision. One of them was our growth trajectory, another one is that we have a healthy, profitable business, that the pandemic has changed the dynamics of education in America, the people who buy our solution have changed their needs or the problems have changed. All those things culminate in the desire to partner with a group like Leeds, and I've been really fortunate to work with amazing people, people who are very mission-driven and people who are very committed, and I'm incredibly grateful for that. Finding a partner who would support our team and back our team was a big priority, and Eric and Scott over at Leeds are really all about that. So that was a key factor for us. It wasn't just ever about the money or it's not just ever about having more resources. It's about having a true partnership that can help us get to the next level.

Clint Betts

How did the pandemic affect your business?

Jeremy Glauser

Well, number one, I feel fortunate and blessed that we didn't have to downsize, layoff anybody. We're able to pivot very quickly with the schools whose students were receiving services onsite. Now we connect and match therapists with these schools and then the therapist delivers services through videoconferencing. So none of the therapists in our community were physically in buildings, so the transition was fluid because the therapists were already online and now the students were at home and they needed a computer, they needed a good internet connection. That was all in a two-week timeframe. Many of the people on our team were responsive and dug in quickly and our team was able to adapt and adjust really quickly. The other thing that it's done is it's changed or maybe even accelerated some of the needs that we thought school districts were going to need in the coming years, and now that's just a more immediate need. Like a software solution for them to run and manage the therapeutic experience within the district. Whether the clinician is onsite or the clinician is online delivering services.

It also introduced new funding sources. There is a new source of funding called ESSER. It's a stimulus package. There were three funds, one, two and three, which are geared towards specific learning loss, social-emotional learning, mental health—investments in education. Because our kids have been affected by this pandemic and their mental health, their social-emotional learning, and even learning loss is a real thing. So that additional funding has enabled districts to think about actually programming a mental health system into their general education population. Whereas historically we've been focused on special education students, now we've broadened the scope into general education students who also need a multi-tiered system of support for their mental health needs. That's an exciting time because I'm a big, big believer in mental health interventions, especially for our young kids and adolescents.

Clint Betts

Like you said, this is a super hard time for them right now, as it is for everyone, but as a kid, I can't even imagine going through something like we've gone through over the past year and a half. Are you seeing those needs drive up in schoolchildren in these schools ... This is a problem here.

Jeremy Glauser

It is a problem, but it's not something that we can't address. So I don't think that I'm freaking out or that our team is freaking out or that schools are freaking out. I think what's happening is that for the first time in our educational system, we have funding and resources to actually and systematically or systemically affect positive change. So the second leading cause of death in our young people is suicide. A majority of mental health concerns that last throughout a person's life are formed by the age of 14. One in five kids in our schools today suffers from mental health disorders and we're looking at research that's coming out where those numbers, the one in five, looks like it may be doubling. So that's a pretty significant increase and some are pointing to the pandemic, others are pointing to other factors. The reality is kids need more support and educators need more resources, more training, and that's only going to come as we invest or use these dollars to invest in the right systems.

Clint Betts

So how do you see, now with this capital partner that you have, now that you've managed to navigate this pandemic in a really healthy and good way, how do you see eLuma Therapy expanding, growing, and really targeting this problem effectively?

Jeremy Glauser

Yeah. I think to say that we handled the pandemic well, I might say we handled it as best we could. It was hard for all of us, including us here. I mean it was hard on clinicians, it was hard on educators. I think the fact that we just stayed together and stuck together is the success. Where we're going from here is really investing heavily in mental health programming for general education as well as launching our software as a service. Today, we really are a tech-enabled service where the services that we match are delivered through our platform and now we're taking that platform and SaaS-ifying it, so to speak, so that we can license it to school districts and hopefully create a much better and more cohesive therapeutic experience in these districts.

So we're hiring a lot of clinicians, meaning speech therapists, occupational therapists, mental health counselors, mental therapists, school psychologists, and we're also hiring people in sales and marketing and engineering and support and these are the kinds of things that we'll be continuing to hire out as we grow and expand. So I think for us, it's launching some products and it's also growing our people.

Clint Betts

Well, it sounds like once you get to a place where it becomes a software as a service platform, will you stay in education? It sounds like you could really even expand outside of that.

Jeremy Glauser

Yeah. I think that's a little bit far out for me to say definitively because as a team, we're very much focused on the K-12 space, but absolutely kids and adolescents need therapy outside of the school buildings and the reality is that we can only provide as much therapy in schools as it helps them to progress academically. So we do have constraints within school buildings. A student who receives 30 minutes in their school might actually need an hour or hour and a half total. So we absolutely see opportunities to go that route, whether it's building or buying or partnering to make a holistic solution available for these kids.

Clint Betts

As I mentioned at the beginning, I think what you're working on, eLuma Therapy, is so important. You're working on such an important problem which is the health of children inside of schools, their mental health and like you said speech therapy, occupational therapy, those types of things. Did you always think you'd have such a mission and purpose-driven company?

Jeremy Glauser

No. I'd be lying to you if I said I always was focused on the mission. I think that for me, for the first half of my career is about finding what I wanted to do, what kind of business, and it wasn't until I had been in my career for a number of years that I realized the business that I want to really invest a decade or more into is something that is mission-driven, and that's about the same time that I decided my purpose in life is to help people fulfill their potential. That's something that I think about a lot, I really want to do that, and it's a great vetting tool for any ideas that I have inside or outside of business. So I would say it was what led me to want to found eLuma in the first place and so it's really what's driven our culture, it's what's driven our recruitment.

I often talk to those that were interviewing about two major motivators to take a job. One is obviously compensation, we got to support our families and ourselves and our life, but the other one is impact. People leave because they don't like their manager or because they can't make an impact or various things that ultimately come back to this human need to feel valued and to create value and at eLuma, making an impact is definitely number one priority, but compensation is right there with it. It's just that we really are a mission-driven organization through and through and I love that that's such a big part of the culture because I love working with these people, and I was going to say coming to work but we're remote so coming to my desk and launching my computer and interacting with these amazing people.

Clint Betts

Have you always been remote, or did that happen because of the pandemic?

Jeremy Glauser

We've always been hybrid.

Clint Betts

Okay.

Jeremy Glauser

And it never felt right to not be hybrid because we are technically an online learning platform. So we have people all over the country, but we do have an office in Lehi and before the pandemic, you'd probably see 15 to 20 people in there. Since the pandemic has hit, we made a transition and you might see 10 to 15 people in there one or two days a week at best. So we're definitely a remote company now.

Clint Betts

Yeah, it's fascinating to see that we can work remote and be just as effective, if not more so, in a lot of these jobs. Now that's not true for some industries and some jobs. For a lot of jobs, it seems like the effectiveness that people were working at is as good as it was when we were all in an office together. It's really fascinating.

Jeremy Glauser

I agree with you, Clint. I think that it depends on role and it depends on industry, but generally speaking, people can be as productive or more productive working from home. I cut out an hour commute time every day by working at home. Now I go to the office one or two days a week because I do want to interface with my team. There's other administrative things that are easier when I'm physically there, but I cut out the commute. I get to pop out and have lunch with my kids or my family. I get to greet them as they come home from school. It's easier to go to the doctor's appointment that's just down the road. All those things make life better but I also think that we have to make sure that as companies and as a society, we draw boundaries and we're still figuring that out I think as a society, even at eLuma.

Because it's easy to work around the clock and never turn it off when we're at home. But it's also easy to not allow people the flexibility to go do something in the middle of the day. So I definitely think we're figuring it out and I think we need to be patient with each other. We need to understand and we just need to have a little bit of grace, I think.

Clint Betts

You mentioned you went to Brigham Young University which is a faith-based institution in Utah. You went, you served a two-year mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, and the heartbreaking and still devastating loss of your mother at 18. I just feel compelled to ask you, how important is faith to you?

Jeremy Glauser

Faith is what's helped define me. I've always been a driven and passionate person, which has its pros and its cons, by the way. When I was about 12, I had a really hard personal experience and I don't know what it was, but it caused me to ask some pretty deep questions about what I wanted to do and what is my life all about. Around that time, I had some experiences that definitely define who I am today and so I would say that it's definitely at my core, and I think what's important for all of us is whether we have a faith, a traditional kind of faith or we believe in other things, what's important for us as humans is to decide what our values are. Because if we live according to our values, we're likely to be a lot happier and if we live according to our values, at least for me, it's an incredible direction to decide where I want to go and what I want to achieve. So I think that that's really what it's taught is that no matter what you believe, having core values is critical to our identity as a human being.

Clint Betts

What's the most valuable leadership lesson you've received or would like to impart on those watching or listening to this show?

Jeremy Glauser

Yeah. Leadership is hard. Leadership is not for the fainthearted, but it's incredibly rewarding. You got to love people. People are everything in leadership. Enabling them, coaching them. I'm not saying enabling them, maybe I should say empowering them, coaching them, and removing barriers. I've had a long and hard learning curve, I would say. But I'm committed to it and I love people. I have had lots of bad examples of what leadership should be and in some of my former careers or jobs you could say, I saw what it meant to not be transparent or to not be honest and those were experiences that taught me, "Okay, I want to be an honest and transparent person." You learn throughout the years what is too transparent, what's not transparent enough. Because you don't want to confuse people. Part of leadership is providing clarity.

As I've studied leadership, there are four principles that I live by, and they're not comprehensive. They're just for me. They're to help give me guidance. The first one is clear direction. People need to have clarity and that's harder than it sounds at first glance because it's an ongoing journey. Clarity is not an event. You also have to give people space and I think that's a lot about empowerment. Because if you don't give them space, you just muffle the human spirit, their creativity, their ability. Then third, holding people accountable. I've had experiences where people have not held me accountable and I don't know what I'm doing right or wrong, and I've had experiences where I've held people maybe too accountable and it's like you're getting in my grill, give me some space. So holding people accountable is a really important thing, and I found one-on-ones and making sure that things are documented and that we have visibility into that, that we're holding each other accountable too is critical, and then fourth, and last but not least, is you got to recognize and reward people. If you never say thank you, then it's got to be said.

Someone taught me a really interesting principle that I thought about a lot related to recognition is that you praise people in public and you correct in private. No one wants to be corrected in front of peers, but praising and rewarding in front of peers builds confidence in themselves but also confidence from peers. So I think those are the major principles that I try to live by as a leader. Hopefully I'm doing okay.

Clint Betts

I'm interested in the first one, clarity. How do you achieve clarity with your team and particularly as an all-remote team now I'm sure that you have to be pretty intentional there.

Jeremy Glauser

There is no such thing as over-communicating in a virtual environment, period. And I have learned that through a lot of different experiences. My big caveat here, Clint, is that we're not perfect at it, I'm sure there are people who do better. But we try dang hard. So as a leadership team, we have ... I'm going to get technical here, but we kind of have this mashup of the advantage framework which is a strategic planning framework, and something called the four disciplines of execution that comes from the Franklin Covey model and our model is a mashup of those. And it really comes down to a one-page document that we create every six months and it answers a few critical questions, and one of those critical questions is “What matters most right now?” From that, we define a handful of objectives, we call them defining objectives, and then we define standard operating objectives.

Those are like the KPIs that tell us whether we're on track, off track, and how we're doing, against these things. That document and that model has evolved and it will continue to evolve, but then we have monthly all-hands and we have town halls and we have one-on-ones and each team is responsible to have their own one-page playbook, we call it, that ties up to the company playbook and the two, the one or maybe two things that matter most right now. Because it's impossible to do everything, and I'm the first to admit that I have shiny object syndrome and I love to look at new ideas, I love to entertain new ideas, but when leading a team or a significant mass, you've really got to have discipline around focus. Because there's just no way you can accomplish everything. So that's the foundation for the clarity and the clarity only comes from having that documentation really crisp and helping people understand it. That ongoing thing is helping people understand what matters most and the defining objectives. So we're a work in progress. I think our team does a great job at it. But like anybody, we're on a journey.

Clint Betts

Right. I was at an event that made me think, I was at an event a few years ago and it was with Netflix CEO Reed Hastings, the founder of Netflix. He said something to me that I think about actually quite often. He said, "If you don't lead yourself, no one will follow you. You first have to lead yourself." So how do you lead yourself throughout ... What does your day look like? How are you structuring like ... I think his point was like, "Hey, you got to follow your own principles, your own advice, your own values." People can see that, right? And so if you're not leading yourself, no one's following you. No one's going to trust you as a leader.

Jeremy Glauser

Yeah. For me it's rituals. It's making sure that I have rituals that keep me healthy and keep me visionary. So everything from eating well to exercising on a regular basis to making sure that when I go on vacation, I really try to go on vacation. That's been a hard one to learn as an entrepreneur. Going from founder to CEO has been challenging and I think taking vacations is one of the core challenges there. But then also making sure that I turn it off. I turn off work when I'm with family and turn off work when I'm doing self-care. I have things that I love to do. I love to read, I love to exercise, I love to be with friends and family, I love to go camping, and these are the things that I know I have to do and actually plan into my life to remain sane.

The other thing is, as a leader, you coach your teams. You're a coach, and one of the things that I've learned is I need a coach as a CEO. Sometimes it's a lonely path because you have great people but maybe they're not always in the position or in the mindset to be my coach, who I can confide in in some of my deepest concerns and desires? So having an executive coach is another important thing to me as a CEO, which I think is something that I've had come to me as highly recommended and I would in turn highly recommend to other CEOs.

Clint Betts

Yeah, and that seems to be critical. Well Jeremy, I can talk to you all day and we'll have you back for sure because I'd love to hear the progress of everything that you're working on. It's been an honor to talk to you and again your company that you're working on is just so fantastic, solving such a critical need. Congratulations on all the success and let's have you back on one of these days.

Jeremy Glauser

I'd love that Clint; this has been awesome. It's fun to share the story because we really do want to help a lot of people and the credit to what we've done is definitely a team effort and some amazing people who don't always get the thank-yous and the opportunity to receive that recognition. So huge shout-out to my team. Huge shout-out to you, Clint, and what you're doing. Thanks for making all this happen.

Clint Betts

Well done. Thanks Jeremy. Have a good one.

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