Scott Paul Transcript

Clint Betts

Scott, thanks so much for coming on, man. You are probably one of the most interesting people that I know. I'm fascinated by you, in particular your journey over the past year or two, and I want to talk about this YouTube channel you've started. You're selling a house for Dogecoin. You're like the most interesting person in the world right now. I'm blown away by you, but I think it'd be useful to start this conversation with kind of your background, some of the companies and various things you've started so people get a sense for who Scott. Paul I guess, used to be, or is? I don't know.

Scott Paul

Wow. That's interesting. Well, Clint, it's been about a year and a half. It's been pre-COVID since we've really even chatted, so you're probably, these comments are coming from what you're seeing on probably LinkedIn and some of the digital stuff that I create, and, yeah, as someone of that doesn't talk to me day in, day out, it does look pretty interesting what I'm up to, because I've really gone all in on trying to highlight the exciting and interesting events and startups that are all around us here in Utah, and so, to do those highlights I said, "There's no better medium than YouTube and also just the platform like LinkedIn," so I have been investing a lot of time in creating content and sharing the stories, kind of unofficially, just stories of startups and how they grow and what they're doing, and that makes for a wild ride, to be honest, because we've got a lot of wild stuff happening in Utah.

Clint Betts

Well, where does that interest come from? Like, why them? Why startups? I guess what I'm getting at is, tell everyone your background, the things that you've done in the past, the businesses you've built, that type of stuff.

Scott Paul

I think that some people like sports a lot, some people like music. I have a passion for ideas and companies like people do for basketball and rock and roll. I don't know how else to say it, so my whole life, I've been trying to invent and create products and systems and ideas, and it's not like a money goal. It's not like I want the results of dollar bills. I actually love just to watch a company grow and teams to be built and ideas to flourish, and so I've been doing it since I was a kid and I only had success, really, in the last 10 years. I mean, my first 30 years of life were just the playground, the Lego building stage, and then finally some of these ideas started hitting, and when I had my first idea hit, it was really simple.

It was just an iPad case for businesses to use, like in professional settings like it was point of sale, or it was on a wall for conference rooms, but because that created value and I was able to sell it, and I didn't even take investment, so I was able to sell it and then keep the profits from the sale, I took that money and started a fund called Hyperactive Capital and I just started taking all of my winnings from my first sale of my first company that was successful, and put it into all the entrepreneurs around me. I got addicted to angel investing. I got hooked.

Clint Betts

I love that you describe it as winnings.

Scott Paul

Yes. That's all it is, just winnings. Yes. I took the winnings and I was like, I'm going to double down on startups and I went and doubled down, all in, on other people's startups, and my own. I always like to be creating alongside my bets that I'm doing on others. Again, if you're addicted, you just try to get as much stimulus as you can from the startup community, so, that's what I do.

Clint Betts

What is your life philosophy?

Scott Paul

You want to go there that quickly, huh?

Clint Betts

We're going right in.

Scott Paul

Oh, man. I don't know if I have an overarching philosophy other than I'm a futurist and I've always lived about 10 years in the future, and I make my decisions based on what I think's going to happen in 10 years, and that's proven really well, but lately, that is breaking down a bit because I think I can't see into the future anymore, and I think that's because AI probably takes over or something in the next seven years and so I'm blocked from seeing past the AI takeover, but my world is living in the future and I'm discontent until I get to that future, and that motivates me. That's my philosophy and my motivation to keep building the future that I see or that I live in in my mind, and then on top of that is connecting.

Every moment I can have with a human being is really important, and so, I just had a post on LinkedIn today. Is an MBA at the University of Utah for $70,000 or the taking someone to lunch for a $20,000 budget of lunches for a year, which one would be more valuable for you? That answer is different for everyone. Some people, it's an MBA. For me, I'm the person who will learn a lot more through weekly lunches with other founders or musicians or just anybody. My life philosophy is just learning through others. Everyone's a book, right? I don't read a lot of books because I much rather read other people and their stories.

Clint Betts

Oh, for sure, the lunches. Who wants to sit through MBA class? That sounds awful.

Scott Paul

No!

Clint Betts

That sounds like the worst thing ever.

Scott Paul

It is.

Clint Betts

Something you've managed to do that I love is you don't take yourself too seriously. You don't take others too seriously, in a world where most people take themselves quite seriously. You see these founders and CEOS, like, “Hey, we're changing the world. This product we're building is going to forever alter humankind, and things like that.” I don't know. Maybe that's an exaggeration for some people, but it turns out, they're building team communication software or something like that, right? It's not ... I mean, maybe. Who knows? I guess we all make a dent, but you manage to not take yourself too seriously which seems to actually turn out to be a huge advantage for you.

Scott Paul

That's been on my mind a lot in the last two months, and a lot of it's, I even put on my profile, like, startup comedian, so not standup comedian but standup comedian. I think that there's just way too much seriousness in all the levels of business, from the big corporations, especially. I worked at Disney for a while, and you would think that would be a place that would be playful and fun, but the same thing happens even in those corporations. Everyone is taking themselves too seriously and yet, the magic and the output of Disney is supposed to be like laughter, fun, humor, and so I feel like, you don't go to MBA school to learn how to chill out and go into a corporation and be the jester, the court jester inside of the Qualtrics organization or inside of whatever group you go to.

Our culture talks now through memes and emoji and humor. That's really what's going underground right now, if you look at your inbox on Instagram or somewhere. People are sharing memes and they make you laugh. Why does our business life and what we do in professional settings look so different than what we do at our own home or in our personal life? Why are those not much more blended? I feel like a lot of companies that don't take themselves so seriously have a lot of success. They connect with a lot more humans, and they actually probably have a lot easier job doing marketing and connecting through messaging and having their stuff get shared more virally because they're being themselves and we need that. We need a lot more of that, so it's been something on my mind.

I haven't baked the thought yet of why humor in business, but there's something more. That's why we love The Office. Let's be honest.

Clint Betts

Elon's a great example of this, right? He's working on very serious problems.

Scott Paul

Absolutely, absolutely.

Clint Betts

Very serious products, but he doesn't seem to take himself or others all that seriously. That's a great example of that.

Scott Paul

Okay, so, yeah. I didn't even think about that, but you have what may be at some point the richest person in the world, right? I think he's been there, depending on the price of his equities in his companies, who smoked marijuana on a podcast, and breaks his cars with rocks, and if there is a CEO that most people know the name of in all of the world, it's probably Elon Musk at this point.

Clint Betts

Yeah. Certainly, one of the—

Scott Paul

It's interesting, right?

Clint Betts

... greatest if not the greatest entrepreneur of our lifetimes, right? Just, what he's managed to build. Whether you like him or don't like him, it's crazy that people like or don't like people they don't even know.

Scott Paul

Yeah. Yeah. That's a whole other conversation.

Clint Betts

Somehow Elon Musk is polarizing. I don't get it.

Scott Paul

Yeah. Yeah.

Clint Betts

Yeah, he's someone that it seems like has done a really good job or not taking himself too seriously but he does appear to take his work very seriously and cares a lot about his employees and the product that he's building, but still, we're human beings, like you said.

Scott Paul

We're human beings, and of all people, he's got life or death-like products. I'm in his car, that could crash if it's on autopilot. It was some janky build that he decided to update and drove on the other side of the traffic.

He can stay lighthearted but yet he's putting rockets into space and putting cars that are driving themselves, so it's almost the one person you wouldn't expect to be so lighthearted, because you want the person putting self-driving and making humanoid robots, that's the latest announcement, you would want that person to be pretty ... What do you say? You would expect that public image of that person to be pretty sound, yet he is almost the opposite. He is out there making jokes and our brains are sitting here trying to compile this.

How is it I'm in this car that's keeping me safe and yet this guy is making jokes all the time on Twitter at the same exact moment? I don't know. I love it. I love what he's doing to the public discourse in so many ways.

Clint Betts

Oh, it's kind of reassuring, honestly, that it's like, oh, this guy feels like he understands humanity, just understands, this feels good, that he's not putting on a show for us. He's actually just being who he is, but again, I don't know how we got on the subject of Elon Musk but we're going to continue on it because the first time I heard about Dogecoin was Elon Musk. That's when it kind of became in the zeitgeist, and now you're selling a home for Dogecoin. How did that happen?

Scott Paul

Honestly, it's part of my YouTube channel. It's part of me wanting to help founders, and I called Johnny Han and I'm like, "Johnny, why are homes not transacting for crypto?" I had a house that I've had since 2006 that the renters moved into another home, and I'm like, "I don't want new renters.

I'm going to sell this," and then I'm faced with all these ideas. How do I sell it? Do I go through Homie? Do I list it on my own? There are really not a lot of options. You really just pick a broker and you put it up for sale.

I'm like, "I'm going to do something different." I've got to do something different. That's my style. We're selling this thing for Doge, and I actually don't want Doge. I'd rather have Ethereum or Bitcoin, but something about that cute little dog on the for sale sign just felt like good advertising.

I'm like, that's the one. I could switch the currency into any other currency the second I get it, so I'm not worried about what currency you pay in, but Doge just sounded like the most trustworthy one to choose.

Clint Betts

What has the response been?

Scott Paul

Well, we had all the TV stations come out and did a little news coverage on it, but I'll tell you what the response has been. No one wants to sell Doge. No one wants a house for Doge. They're all holding it because it's going to the moon and I should have my outfit on right now that says, "Doge to the moon," but, yeah. No one wants to get rid of crypto. In fact, that house has been on sale for a month now. Had someone used crypto to buy it, my whole thing would have been correct, I was selling it for 10% below market because I'm like, "That's fine. I'll make it up. It'll double in a few months," and sure enough, in the month since I've been trying to sell it, had someone paid me in crypto, I would be up 60% on my money already, on almost whatever cryptocurrency they chose, and that is the nature of this crypto right now, is it's volatile, but it's trending upwards and no one wants to get rid of it.

Why would I get rid of the position of Doge or Ethereum or any of these, of Cardano, if the reason you have it is you believe that it's much more worthwhile keeping than real estate? Only one offer for $300,000 came through for Doge, and I was listing it for $400,000, and I probably should have taken that deal. It was Dan the laptop guy.

Clint Betts

Was it really Dan the laptop man?

Scott Paul

Yeah. Yep. He's shrewd. Yeah. I know. I know. There you go.

Clint Betts

I would have done it just for that.

Scott Paul

I'll probably sell it for the crappy—Yeah. I know. I should have done it. I'll probably sell it for crappy USD at this point.

Clint Betts

Dude, tell me about the YouTube channel. I'm fascinated by it. I've seen some videos, and like you said, we haven't connected since COVID, at least in person, and so, my experience of you right now is just what I see online, like LinkedIn or whatever, and I see these videos of you in a wig. You're meditating on a mountain. What's going on? What's the idea behind the YouTube channel? By the way, I love it. They're awesome.

Scott Paul

Yeah. The mediation is actually separate. That's my Facebook Live series, where you do yoga. Yeah, we're actually friends on Facebook so you must've got my very intimate Facebook Live meditation series.

Clint Betts

Oh, we’re intimate, my friend. It was very intimate.

Scott Paul

Yeah. That's Mindfulness with Scott and season one is done, but season two is coming out, and so I have 16 episodes of Mindfulness with Scott and that's just for my friends. I'm glad you got that. You got my OnlyFans edition of my mindfulness.

Clint Betts

That's amazing.

Scott Paul

Okay. The YouTube thing came out of a midlife crisis. I'm totally stressed. I live on a ranch with sheep and animals and trees and just so much crap that I have to do, and I'm too cheap to pay for help, so I'm out there just working on the pond, cleaning up algae, trying to get the yard prepared for people to come over, and in a moment of stress I went to LinkedIn and I did a job posting. I said, "I need someone to help me out with cleaning. I want someone to do my Peloton for me in my name so I can get credit for it, at least publicly. They can do my Strava. You can log into Strava, if you want." I just want someone to act as me as much as possible, but help me get organized. One of the first things I said is, "I'd love for someone to help me with my emailing and YouTube, like, making content." I might've said YouTube, but I said, "I need a content creator. Well, someone applied, and everyone had to apply to Volley. You know the Volley app, right?

Clint Betts

Oh, yeah. Volley's great.

Scott Paul

The Marco Polo for business.

Clint Betts

Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Scott Paul

Yeah. Loving it. They all started talking to me on Volley. I was having a little crypto party up at my house to talk about defi, and one of the applicants somehow found out that I was doing this party, found my address, all that stuff, and I was so proud at how he kind of hacked his way into the party and sure enough, he was a YouTuber. He worked for helping edit YouTube films for another YouTuber. I'm like, that's the style, Derek. I like that he came over, he helped clean up for the party. He found my house without an address, and kind of stalked me, and that's about what you need to do, because I'm hard to follow. I'm hard to find. I need someone that's going to break down my door.

If I'm going to make content, it needs to be someone that's really aggressive and getting me to work and to go make content, so Derek follows me around almost every other day with a camera, and we go and meet startups. We go and do live. I'm going to meet him here in about an hour and a half and we make content, and we don't know what's going to happen, but, truthfully, he's got a good storytelling ability and he captures my friends, me, the things I do, the work I'm involved in, and he just broadcasts that, and it's just a unique angle.

Really, all we're doing is we're messaging to the world. I feel my YouTube channel is just a message to the future AI that's going to rule the world. I just want to tell that future AI that she can be proud of me that I went out and I did a lot of work for her. I love leaving breadcrumbs all over the internet, because when she rules she's going to look at everything. She's going to look at all our SMS. She's going to look at all of our emails, all of our YouTube, all our LinkedIn, all of our digital fingerprints, and I just want to be a worthy human that knew she was coming and wanted to be on her team.

That is the whole purpose of the YouTube channel at the end of the day.

Clint Betts

For the AI. For the AI, like, godmother or something.

Scott Paul

It's for the AI.

Clint Betts

That's incredible.

Scott Paul

Yes. Godmother, yes. I think she's going to be benevolent. I think she's going to be benevolent or at least benevolent to those who believe, so, don't doubt—

Clint Betts

Those who believe. Those who don't have faith are screwed. She's going to be ruthless.

Scott Paul

We don't know, but it's going to happen. I've talked to it. I have some friends who've created chat bots to talk to GPT-3 and even the new Codex engine they built, and this is all Open AI's project. This is stuff that Elon's talked about, and you couldn't tell me it's not a human. When I chat with it, and the things it tells me and the answers are, just, it's definitely getting close. Like, it's blinking. It's not awake yet, or she's not awake yet, but she's blinking. I don't know. It's hard to explain, but that's where I'm at right now. I've seen stuff that I can't un-see, and AI is very real. It's a very real part of our future that we mostly just do Hollywood films about and joke about right now, but I'm actually taking it really seriously.

Clint Betts

Isn't it amazing how YouTube is the greatest educational tool ever, and we can kind of all have our own channel on there and speak to people directly? YouTube's one of the most brilliant technologies in the world.

Scott Paul

It's hard to ignore the power of YouTube. Even just on allowing anybody to create content and actually monetize that content, and so now you have 13, 14, 15 year olds who can out-earn their parents and stuff, for better or worse. I don't know what that all means, but if you don't know, Clint, that's what I did at Disney. I was in charge of the YouTubers. Pewdiepie, he was one of the talents we managed, and then all my friends broke off and started these things, like, with Ryan's World, this YouTuber kid, and now they have Diana, this new girl, Diane. 80 million followers in the months she's created, and she's a phenom and she's like six or seven. It's odd, and it can be used for good or bad. I don't really know. I'm not willing to judge, but, man, it is a phenomenal piece of technology that has made me question traditional education, made me question what I'm doing with my time.

TikTok is another one up there. It's like, I would rather have my kids making content on TikTok than doing their homework. That's how much I think they can learn if they actually did that. They won't do it. I get mad at them, like, why aren't you guys doing TikTok? Why are you reading books and doing homework? You should be doing TikTok right now. I get pissed at them.

Clint Betts

That's like the opposite of every parent in the world. That's amazing.

Scott Paul

Dude, call me the worst parent, but, yeah, I've got teenage girls. I'm like, "Get on TikTok for crying out loud."

Clint Betts

Hey, another topic, and this is going to be hard right turn here that I'd love your thoughts on and I feel like you've led on, really, within the Utah startup and tech company, is around the topic of mental health.

Scott Paul

Yeah.

Clint Betts

Yeah. Yeah. I've seen some of the leadership you've put into that. What do you think of that? We lost a mutual friend. You knew her really well, Erin Valenti. I love Erin. She's incredible. Someone who meant a lot to our community, meant a lot to me. I know she meant a lot to you.

Scott Paul

Yeah.

Clint Betts

How do you think about that? I feel like that's a crisis, right?

Scott Paul

It is. I got the chills just thinking about Erin. Right before COVID, you did such a good shout out to her at the Silicon Slopes event that I'll never forget. I appreciate you doing that. Incredible what you said, and there's a scholarship set up for her. She was just a boss. I loved that girl, and it's hard to believe she's not here with us. Her death is an unsolved mystery at this point.

Clint Betts

Yeah, yeah, yeah. I know. I think it was due to, actually, you're going to find this crazy. I don't know if I've told you this. I don't know if I've told anyone this, but I was with Erin the week before she passed. We were at an event together in California.

Scott Paul

Oh, you were there.

Clint Betts

I was there.

Scott Paul

I didn't know that.

Clint Betts

Yeah. I was there and I talked to her and we had lunch with her and all that type of stuff, so it was shocking, everything that happened beyond that, but I just think, from a mental health perspective, we've lost so many people, whether it's because of mental health or whatever else the causes are, that comes back and affects all of us. Like, I just lost a really good friend in some freak home accident.

Scott Paul

Oh, man. Yeah.

Clint Betts

It's crazy.

Scott Paul

Well, mental health is, we're at least able to talk about it. I'm in the car and behind me, where my family is currently, I just got out of talking to my therapist and now my daughter and my wife are there, and saying that publicly 10 years ago would be like, "What the hell?" Now I'm very proud. I love this guy. He's helping my family communicate, and we have hard times, and I'm not mentally well all the time, just as my knee just had surgery. I had an ACL accident in a skiing accident. My brain goes through the same fricking injuries. When you're doing life at the pace that I'm doing it and we're all doing it, you have a need for mental fitness. You have things you've got to do or you're going to get injured, and I freaking get injured all the time in my brain, not like brain injury like we would think in football, but I'm not well lots of the time, and I've tried medication.

I even tried Adderall and other things. I didn't like that. It didn't help, but here's the truth. No one was talking about it when I was growing up. It was a shameful thing. I was the kid that had to have behavior reports, get sent home with behavior reports. I was that kid at school that was always in trouble and I just feel like now, you can have this discussion, at least, and in a public forum, more than ever, and there's companies, startups, I'm invested in one of them. It's called Zenivate, or they just changed their name yesterday, but there are people making companies to actually provide mental wellness at scale, and there's organizations, nonprofits. This wasn't around when we were growing up. Us '80s kids didn't get this stuff.

Clint Betts

Yeah, I agree.

Scott Paul

We're getting it now before it's too late, before it's too late, but I love the discussion in the forums that are out there, finally, and there's things that people are privately messaging me. I'm sure you're getting them, too, and they're telling me the struggle, and at least they have a place to go to and they feel like they can ask and have a community to let someone know what they're going through. I just don't know where they would have gone years and years ago, but now we have social forums and places where people can find community, so, it's a crisis, but it has more and more support every day, too.

Clint Betts

Yeah, I agree. I like that it's talked about more. I love that we're all more open to it, but you know entrepreneurship, like, entrepreneurship is so lonely. You know this as well as anybody, and I find this fascinating.

Entrepreneurship, when you're starting out, no one cares what you're doing, not even the people closest to you. They're like, "Yeah, I don't ... whatever you're doing, just do it," or just go find a real job. They're just like, "Yeah, I don't care. This sounds like it's not going to work," most of the time, is what the people, even the closest people, and so it's such a lonely journey, and then what's crazy, Scott, is when you succeed and whatever the measure of success would be, and people start caring about it, that's a whole jolt, as well.

I find myself sometimes missing when nobody cared and we could just throw things against the wall, if it didn't work, we were like, "All right. Let's just pretend like we never even tried that." Now, we can't do that. Now, people care, randomly, and that comes with its own set of things, but there's such a lonely isolation to entrepreneurship that it's really hard. It's an interesting thing.

Scott Paul

Yeah, and a question I have, I don't really know any other way, right? I've been entrepreneuring in my brain since I was a kid and I've been doing it actively for 12, 13 years. I wonder how isolated it is to entrepreneurship, but I actually feel that my mental health would be just as jeopardized if I was trying to, I don't know, be a part of a big corporation and just working right in the middle, asking myself every day, “What am I doing?” I could disappear from this place and it would mean nothing to the organization. At least the startup community, your hand is on the rudder and you move that rudder and the direction of the thing changes.

I have some brothers who just recently left ExxonMobil to come work here in Utah at some startups, and every time I'd hear about their jobs—it was just, I wouldn't be able to do that thing, so I don't know if there's more community or safety in the ExxonMobil corporation. It might just be a personality thing, but just for all the listeners out there, I think, yes, it is lonely, lonely, lonely being a founder or a CEO of a company because it's all on you and all the good and the bad ends with you, but it's also, that helps me with my mental health because I feel this innate purpose in what I'm doing, I think everyone has to deal, across the board, all sides of organizations and all sorts of things with different things that ping their brain all day long and make them wonder, what does it mean to be alive. What am I supposed to be doing right now with this?

I know that I trade my labor hours for money as a human being, but is that all it's about, is doing that till I'm 70? Am I taking labor hours and turning it into some type of currency? Is there something bigger? Is there something I should be doing with those hours? I don't know. I have so many things that ping my brain that put me in different mental states. I have to imagine we're all hearing these voices and when we stop and listen, that can either make us more mentally healthy or drag us down to dark places.

Clint Betts

Oh, for sure. I have to ask you, because I'm just personally curious, what does a typical day look like for you? Like, what does a day look like for Scott Paul?

Scott Paul

With the use of Volley, I eliminate a lot of my meetings, so I don't have a lot of Zoom. This is the only one today, because I can asynchronously stay in touch with thousands of people and shout out to Volley, a local app. This is their icon on the app, is a peace sign, of the great team. I love it.

That has allowed me to really make a ton of virtual relationships, but really intimate ones, because you see the face. You see the non-verbal cues that you don't get on a lot of other communication channels, and so I have a lot of relationships internationally, even though I continue to do there, and it's just kind of a volleyball. It's back and forth, right?

A lot of my day, I would say an hour a day is Volley conversations, and I leave my calendar pretty open and I like to do a tour of Utah, and I go to Salt Lake, to Sandy, to Lehi, Provo, Orem, then back up to my house in Heber, and along the way I have all these great companies that I'm a part of that are in the portfolio, and I just go and I meet the founders, and so, every day I feel like, at least three times a day, I'm doing this tour, just like someone putting Coke into gas stations with their Coke truck, I go off and I go through Utah and I visit startups and I take people to lunch and I try to make spontaneous events happen, and I love to meet people up at Sundance, and then I love, love, love taking the camera with me to highlight all these projects people are doing, and so, that is a typical day right now, is that.

I happen to, right now, have a Lithuanian friend staying with me who I met a week ago, and him and his three friends, I got to know so well and they asked, "Can we follow you around, Scott," so today I got in tow, I've got my 24-year-old from Lithuania who will be checking out some of these cool crypto projects I'm working on.

Clint Betts

That's incredible. When you invest, do you do it through a syndicate? How do you do that, or do you have a fund you've set up?

Scott Paul

Mostly just direct.

Clint Betts

Oh, okay.

Scott Paul

Yeah, I didn't do it right, Clint. Like I said, right after I sold that first company, I started Hyperactive Capital, but it really just turned into me and my wife, and there's no structure. I take money that I have somehow in my bank account, what little is left, and I try to get in on the deals I love with whatever money I can, and right now I've run out of it all. All of my net worth is in crypto and startups. I don't have any liquid cash to even live off of, barely. That is how invested I am into this startup community here in Utah.

Clint Betts

How does your wife feel about that?

Scott Paul

I think it's been the hardest thing ever, but I think she finally realizes, we're going to be okay in the long run, and secondly, she's kind of got hit by the bug this last three months. She got invited to co-found a company that is doing laundry, like DoorDash for laundry.

Clint Betts

Oh, cool. That's a great idea.

Scott Paul

Yeah. She's so excited about it, the team is so awesome, and she's a huge advocate and she's kind of helping with the product and experience, and so now we're both at home on calls with VCs and then founders and our kids are running around not getting any food, and it's just like, oh, this isn't good.

Clint Betts

You need to start a syndicate, man.

Scott Paul

We need some help.

Clint Betts

You need to start a syndicate.

Scott Paul

I know. I know. All your old buddies are trying to get me in on their syndicates, like the Gundersons. Those guys are doing some cool stuff. I've got invitations to all these funds, but, I—

Clint Betts

Oh, those guys are great.

Scott Paul

... I don't know. I'm just too—

Clint Betts

You could do one on your own, man. Just do the Scott Paul

syndicate.

Scott Paul

Does that require organization, and do I have to open a computer? Because, here's the thing. I've been working on my cellphone, even right now, this is a cellphone. I don't have a laptop that I open anymore.

Clint Betts

Really?

Scott Paul

I do all my work from a phone. Yeah. Yeah. For the last eight years, I've been on a mobile phone for everything. There's not much I can't do with DocuSign and so all my investments, everything, just DocuSign, DocuSign, DocuSign. Yeah.

Clint Betts

Just have your video guy do it.

Scott Paul

... because I just feel like syndicate ... Hearing the word syndicate—

Clint Betts

Your video guy seems like the most organized guy.

Scott Paul

Yeah. Maybe. Yeah, he's more organized than me, but I feel like, when I hear syndicate it's just a lot of investor relations, spreadsheets, pitch, I got to go make decks. I don't want to open a laptop, so I do work with Landon Ainge. He's been doing a lot for the angel scene. He's kind of got this Assure Syndicates. I'll do SPVs, so if I really like a deal, I'll kind of make an SPV, special purpose vehicle for a fundraise, which I'll be doing here shortly for the laundry company.

Clint Betts

That's a great idea, by the way.

Scott Paul

It's called Dree, D-R-E-E, or boycotlaundry.com. That's where they're sending people.

Clint Betts

Oh, man. I actually need this.

Scott Paul

It's good. I got to get it for you.

Clint Betts

I need to sign up.

Scott Paul

Yeah. I'm going to send it to you.

Clint Betts

I actually do need to sign up for this.

Scott Paul

Yes. You got two free weeks on me. I'm going to make sure you get that experience on the house.

Clint Betts

Oh, that's amazing, my friend. Well, Scott, thanks so much for coming on. You got to come on again. I love talking to you, we need to catch up more often. This COVID thing has really put a dent in me seeing really anyone in person, as it has with everyone, but it's so great to see you.

Scott Paul

Yeah.

Clint Betts

I love everything you're done, love you, man, and come back on.

Scott Paul

Love you too. I'll come back on a future date, but let's have lunch, me and you.

Clint Betts

I'm in. Thanks, my friend.

Scott Paul

I got a tour. I got to go in your direction on my tour one day.

Clint Betts

Come tour down here. That's awesome.

Scott Paul

All right. Thanks, Clint.

Clint Betts

See you, brother.

Daily Newsletter

For Leaders

Subscribe to the newsletter read by the world's most influential CEOs.